The 6 Best Diets for Heart Health

 While so many different diets claim to promote heart health, it is important to select one that is supported by solid scientific research and which is easy to follow over the long term. The Mediterranean diet is based around the normal eating habits of people who live in southern Italy and Greece during the early 1960s (9). The dietitian who devised this diet claims that people in this region at a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, cereals, legumes, nuts, seeds, and olive oil, with little or no meat. As stated by the dietitian, the Mediterranean countries have been separated because of the differences in their diets; thus, there are many variations of this diet.

Most diets work by restricting certain foods or increasing the consumption of other foods in an effort to lose weight. This diet aims to reduce the risk of heart diseases and diabetes by reducing the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol in the diet. The primary components of the Mediterranean diet includes grains, vegetables, healthy oils (such as olive oil), and fruit and nuts. The major contributors to the diet's taste include garlic, tomatoes, red bell peppers, onions, and spices. The diet is also rich in low-fat dairy products, mostly skimmed. The major contributors to the taste of the Mediterranean diet are tomatoes, legumes, nuts, seeds, and olive oil.


The diet has been shown to have some positive effects in terms of heart health and blood pressure. However, one review of the studies that had been conducted specifically on the diet concluded that further studies must be conducted in order to confirm these results. Still, the diet appears to be an effective way to control high cholesterol levels and is recommended by some health professionals to help people who want to lose weight.

The Mediterranean Diet has been compared to the Low-fat, High Fiber (LF/HT) and The Australian Dietary Guidelines. The comparisons between the Mediterranean and Low-fat, High-fiber (LF/HT) diets conclude that both diets provide a healthy way to lose weight. The Mediterranean diet contains significantly lower rates of saturated fat, trans-fats, cholesterol, and sodium than does the American diet. The Low-fat, high-fiber diet contains significantly lower rates of total cholesterol, sodium, and trans-fats than the Mediterranean diet. Both diets can be classified as predominantly meat-based, which emphasizes animal protein over plant protein.

The studies comparing the Mediterranean diet to the LAV or Mediterranean heart disease risk factors suggest that the Mediterranean diet prevents some types of cancers, particularly colon cancer, while the LAV diet increases the risk of some types of cardiovascular diseases. The studies also indicate that the LAV diet decreases the risk of diabetes and certain blood pressure, while the Mediterranean diet increases the risk of both diabetes and hypertension. The LAV diet also appears to be a protective factor for some types of stroke, such as myocardial infarction, or stroke. The studies comparing the Mediterranean diet to the Western diet have not established any beneficial association between the Mediterranean diet and type II diabetes, gallstones or kidney stones, or general cardiovascular disease. However, the studies comparing the LAV to the Mediterranean diet and the Western diet indicate that the LAV diet may be beneficial in preventing type II diabetes.

The 6 Best Diets for Heart Health emphasizes eating minimally processed foods and whole foods as the primary source of dietary fat while increasing the consumption of nuts, seeds, legumes, and vegetables. The minimally processed foods are those that are low in saturated fat, sodium, cholesterol, and the oxidized fats (protein, lignin, and polyunsaturated fats), whereas the whole foods are the foods that are high in unsaturated fat, salt, cholesterol, and the oxidized fats. The minimally processed foods include those that are high in fiber, potassium, protein, calcium, and magnesium, whereas the whole foods include those that are high in saturated fat, sodium, cholesterol, protein, phosphorus, potassium, iron, and fiber. These diets compare favorably to the Mediterranean diet and the USDA food guide pyramid, which are recommended for overall dietary management and weight management among children and adults. It is important to incorporate these diets into the daily life of the people to promote heart health and reduce the chances of developing cardiovascular diseases or other health conditions, such as diabetes and heart attacks. These diets promote heart health by helping you reduce your risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attacks, and strokes.

 

The 6 Best Diets for Heart Health The 6 Best Diets for Heart Health Reviewed by True Health of Mother on January 15, 2021 Rating: 5

No comments:

Powered by Blogger.